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NMSU Arrowhead Center to host Department of Defense funding opportunity event in Albuquerque

NMSU Arrowhead Center to host Department of Defense funding opportunity event in Albuquerque

The New Mexico Federal and State Technology Partnership Program, housed at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center, will host a Small Business Innovation Research Department of Defense Navy topics event next month in Albuquerque.

The event will take place from 7:30 a.m. to noon Dec. 6 at STC.UNM, 801 University Blvd. SE in Albuquerque. This event is free, and tickets are available at https://navysbirtopics_abq.eventbrite.com. Refreshments will be provided.

The event will be divided into two segments. The first will be a live webinar streaming which will feature the Navy SBIR Program Offices discussing their recently released SBIR/STTR topics; representatives from both the Naval Sea Systems Command and the Naval Air Systems Command will participate. NAVSEA SBIR program manager Jason Schroepfer will be available in person to answer questions post-webinar and will also be holding private one-on-one sessions.

NM FAST program manager Zetdi Sloan sees the event as an opportunity for local tech firms.

“Pre-proposal communications can have a powerful impact on the applicant’s thinking, from reshaping the research design to rethinking where the proposal should be submitted, or if it should be written at all,” Sloan said. “Potential applicants do not want to miss this opportunity to get it right at the beginning.”

The event presents an opportunity for small technology firms to learn how their innovative ideas or capabilities – either technology or services – can be delivered to the DoD. The Navy invests $350 million of non-dilutive funds every year in innovative ideas.

“This is going to be an exciting opportunity for New Mexico based small business leaders to learn about the US Navy’s mission areas and specific innovative technology development opportunities,” said Todd Bisio, NM FAST’s network coordinator. “In addition, it is a great opportunity for the businesses to build relationships and expose the customer to the capabilities that they have to offer. The DoD has the largest budget across the eleven federal agencies that currently participate in the SBIR/STTR program and the Navy is a big part of that. Having the Navy as a customer can be extremely beneficial to any small business and this is a great point of entry.”

The NM FAST program, which is supported by a grant from the U.S. Small Business Administration, works to improve the participation of small businesses in federal SBIR and Small Business Technology Transfer programs for innovative, technology-driven small businesses. NM FAST has been gaining traction in New Mexico by offering statewide workshops, mentoring, and micro-grant awards for eligible small businesses.
NM FAST provides small businesses with:

– Assistance in identifying appropriate solicitations and topic areas;
– How-to information on agency registrations and electronic proposal submission;
– Guidance on proposal preparation, including assessments of technical objectives and hypotheses and drafting supporting documents such as biographical sketches, resources and budgets;
– Specifics on the target agency’s requirements for commercialization content in Phase I/Phase II proposals; and
– Technical reviews and edits of proposals with feedback.

In addition, NM FAST provides select first-time awardees microgrants of $650 to cover the expenses of professional services such as commercialization plan assistance, development partner identification assistance, research partner identification assistance, counsel on patents and technology licensing, and indirect cost rate advisement, for proposal development.

For more information, contact Dana Catron, program coordinator for the NM FAST program, at 505-358-4039 or dderego@ad.nmsu.edu.

Understanding the University’s Role in Startup Ecosystems

Understanding the University’s Role in Startup Ecosystems

November 14, 2016

Successful startups are not created in a vacuum. They are connected to networks comprised of faculty, mentors and other innovators. Higher education institutions can play a crucial role in an entrepreneurial ecosystem, and even a more important role within developing economies. We spoke with Dr. Griselda T. Martínez, program director of Spanish Entrepreneurial Training Programs at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center about the impact educational institutions can have on empowering and growing a network within emerging economies.

How do early-stage startups benefit from universities as an active partner in the regional entrepreneurial ecosystem?

Startups benefit from university involvement in ecosystems in a number of ways. Universities are hubs of human capital, knowledge, and expertise. They are able to connect entrepreneurs, who are also often innovators, with subject matter experts in areas outside the entrepreneurs’ areas of expertise such as accounting, law, engineering, or business, to name a few. Quite often, university experts serve as consultants, helping entrepreneurs in the process of a startup creation and growth. These relationships are invaluable given the value embedded in the learning process that can be replicated by the entrepreneurs in any other situation.

Universities can also play a critical role in a startup’s vetting process. With a concentration of knowledge in the crucial aspects of launching and growing a business that includes technical as well as business knowledge, universities are able to offer validation checkpoints throughout a startup’s journey. A positive side effect to the vetting process: entrepreneurs behind the startups become more business savvy, more confident, aware of the critical aspects and ready to speak the required and specific language relevant to the different stakeholders. Stakeholders may include potential partners and investors.

Universities and other academic institutions can also offer a venue where ideas can turn into proven concepts by using the technical capabilities such as specialized equipment and the technical expertise not available in the industry, and available at a prohibitive cost. Capstone courses working as proof-of-concept labs are an opportunity for both startups and faculty members to capture the knowledge, creativity, and ideas from students and turn them into the creation of working prototypes of a product or service at the completion of the academic course. The ability that startups have to be flexible and receptive to suggestions from students represent to entrepreneurs the ability to continue their creative process with concrete outcomes beneficial to the venture creation.

Lastly, students who are aspiring entrepreneurs can tap into the university’s intellectual property (IP) portfolio for licensing opportunities. This potentially can turn research projects turned into IP into real products taken to the markets by entrepreneurs through the creation of startups.

 How do universities benefit from that partnership?

As a key component to a vibrant entrepreneurial ecosystem, entrepreneurs and academic institutions are key elements to this equation in the greater context. Entrepreneurs building startups bring energy and enthusiasm to the university and an incentive to promote applied research. In emerging economies, research may not exist within the culture. The possibility of partnerships through capstone-like classes and other research projects allow entrepreneurs to provide a reality check on the kinds of resources and programs universities should provide versus what they think they need to provide. This is crucial in keeping the institution’s programs relevant for current and future students with respect to industry and innovation as an element to the academic training experience for students. Working with real projects that will become products transform into applied research projects led by researchers and involving students. Additionally, the learning process of students providing viable solutions in a real environment bridges the gap between theoretical and applied knowledge.

By startups joining the university’s network, entrepreneurs become a valuable resource for faculty members and students when they engage with current students. University affiliated startups become potential mentors, coaches, investors, by providing internship opportunities for students, new hires for their own company, and/or donors. Prospective students may also have the option to consider specific universities based on the institution’s reputation to non-academic aspects such entrepreneurial culture, startup creation, funding, competitions, and other opportunities linked to startups and entrepreneurship. This is key to any university and/or any community working on building an entrepreneurial culture and ecosystem targeting the student population.

The ability to transfer out technologies developed at academic institutions is another benefit to to partnering with startups. Academic institutions produce intellectual property (IP) through research and is protected through patents, trademarks, or copyrights. Entrepreneurs linked to startups may be the actors transforming IP into real products and taking them to local and global markets. The more successful a university is at transferring technologies out of the laboratory into products, often known as commercialization of technologies, the higher the rates of return on investment. The funds result of technology transfer may become available to fund other projects, expand in the number of research projects, and ideally create an array of programs that continue to incentivize the technology transfer process to a larger number of licensees.

Partnering with key actors within the ecosystem is critical when federal funding is available for innovative programs that aim to incentivize technology transfer and commercialization of technologies. An example of this in an emerging economy is the pilot program implemented in Mexico in an effort to replicate the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) I-Corps program, which was possible by a partnership between NSF, Mexico’s CONACYT, and academic institutions. This program aims to commercialize technologies by market validation through active teams formed by researchers, students within an academic institution, and business mentors.

What are some ways ecosystems can initiate and nurture university partnerships?

It is important to start with identifying a common mission or vision for this partnership. Finding an institution that shares the same goals, paired with the capabilities and capacities needed by the startup is also a plus. If the startups are proactively outreaching to the universities, bringing awareness of the benefits to both is key to setting a vision and mission in common in which both parts will contribute in their very own way.

To encourage universities to become an active ecosystem partner, it is important to highlight relevant and positive outcomes of non-traditional partnerships in creative programs, either within their institution or at sister institutions. Examples of this may include technology showcases of joint research that reached the market or sharing past success stories attached to partnerships such as the one being explored. It’s common for some level of entrepreneurial efforts or interest to exist within the institution. It is key that entrepreneurs are aware of them and actively engage in those efforts. Given the interest of universities in the students’ experience, entrepreneurs from startups can actively engage with aspiring entrepreneurs as role models and mentors.

International partners for emerging economies may represent potential funding sources and partners for further capacity building. Examples of such programs include the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), the Inter-American Development Bank, the World Bank, global non-for-profit organizations, and specific partnerships like the Mexico-United States Entrepreneurship and Innovation Council. Local champions connecting the dots through their knowledge of these types of opportunities within and outside the region may represent a game-changing strategy.

Entrepreneurs and other champions in the community should also make the institution aware of any potential challenges – and recommend ways to overcome those obstacles. It is important to maintain effective communication throughout the process, showcasing the flexibility and willingness to adapt in response to unforeseen hurdles from the startup’s’ perspective.

What are common obstacles for these partnerships to develop and grow? How can either party overcome the hurdles?

Some universities are burdened with bureaucracy, which can make it difficult to start new programs. Building trustworthy relationships and recognizing the opportunities are mutually beneficial first steps. Finding faculty and/or researchers within departments that are open and flexible to work with startups on small initiatives that can be championed is key to larger initiatives to follow.

Academic institutions are required to show results and benefits as part of their education, research, and in some cases, economic development. To develop frameworks for new programs, it is crucial to track, document, and communicate the impact of the ongoing and past joint projects between universities and startups.

The creation of memorandums of understanding between universities and startups to collaborate may allow circumventing some of the bureaucracy tied to large academic institutions. Startups may provide small donations to fund equipment or other capabilities within the university. In exchange, students can be engaged in supporting and furthering startups’ research and technical challenges with the faculty members acting as liaisons between startups and student teams.  Some academic institutions allow for faculty members to create new classes and content of the new classes as long as they are relevant to the study plan.

Disengagement from faculty and staff may result from lack of understanding of the mutual benefits from working with startups. In this situation, startups need to take the initiative and communicate the benefits of a partnership. Startups and their technical challenges and (often limited resources) are a great opportunity for educational partnerships. Lastly, alumni joining startup teams may become a research liaison, building bridges between the academic institutions and the startup networks.


About Dr. Griselda T. Martínez 

griselda

 

Griselda T. Martínez leads efforts towards providing both business and technical assistance to a wide variety of businesses in the region, the state of New Mexico and Mexico, including Hispanic and Spanish-speaking ventures. She oversees NMSU’s role in the New Mexico Small Business (NSMBA) Program, in partnership with Los Alamos and Sandia National Laboratories. She is also in charge of the implementation of programs targeting entrepreneurial education and ecosystem enhancement for Spanish-speaking national and international communities. She holds a doctorate degree in Economic Development from NMSU, with an area of specialization in Regional Economic Development.

July

July

Title: Design Thinking Introduction
Speaker: Estela Hernandez Hartley
Location: Deming

Title: Business Model Innovation
Speaker: Estela Hernandez Hartley
Location: Silver City

NM FAST program at NMSU Arrowhead Center hosts SBIR panel session.

NM FAST program at NMSU Arrowhead Center hosts SBIR panel session.

The New Mexico Federal and State Technology Partnership Program, housed at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center, will host a Small Business Innovation Research Best Practices Panel session in Albuquerque.

The panel will take place from 3-5 p.m. Oct. 27, at the Air Force Research Laboratory PTi Sunport. This event is free, and tickets are available at https://panel2016.eventbrite.com. Refreshments will be provided.

The panel, which will feature Joy Colucci, Bill Goodman and Jeff Grusy – all local leaders in the SBIR arena – will highlight tips and best practices for submitting a strong SBIR proposal. Todd Bisio, who also has several SBIR awards under his belt, will moderate.

“Thanks to the U.S. Small Business Administration, the NM FAST program has the ability to reach and directly support small business concerns across the state of New Mexico,” Bisio said. “This panel discussion format will be a great way to gain access to additional perspectives, success stories and lessons learned from experts with winning track records.”

The panel session presents an opportunity for small businesses to engage with successful SBIR winners. Goodman, founder and president of Goodman Technologies, LLC., has been awarded over thirty-seven SBIR grants, and brings a wealth of knowledge from his years in the defense industry. Colucci, President at Metis Technology Solutions, Inc., has been immersed in the New Mexico and California tech scenes for years, and has led several NASA R&D programs. After retiring from the Air Force, Grusy continued on in Albuquerque, leading technology thrust areas and business development activities for two prominent defense contractors.

“We are looking forward to talking to this distinguished and knowledgeable group of expert panelists,” Bisio said. “The SBIR/STTR program is a great opportunity to gain access to funding for technology development, but it is a highly competitive process. Learning from these experts will only strengthen our small business S&T community and we are grateful for their willingness to share their valuable time and expertise.”

NM FAST program manager Zetdi Sloan sees the panel as an opportunity for entrepreneurs.

“This flagship event provides the chance for entrepreneurs and researchers to hear lessons learned, trends, and forge new relationships that can help bring technologies and discoveries to market,” Sloan said.

The NM FAST program, which is supported by a grant from the SBA, works to improve the participation of small businesses in federal SBIR and Small Business Technology Transfer programs for innovative, technology-driven small businesses. NM FAST has been gaining traction in New Mexico by offering statewide workshops, mentoring, and micro-grant awards for eligible small businesses.

“It is the goal of NM FAST to help the start-up community grow, become more diversified, and have a real and sustained economic impact in our state,” Sloan said.

The NM FAST Partnership Program provides small businesses with:

• Assistance in identifying appropriate solicitations and topic areas;
• How-to information on agency registrations and electronic proposal submission;
• Guidance on proposal preparation, including assessments of technical objectives and hypotheses and drafting supporting documents such as biographical sketches, resources and budgets;
• Specifics on the target agency’s requirements for commercialization content in Phase I/Phase II proposals; and
• Technical reviews and edits of proposals with feedback.

In addition, NM FAST provides select first-time awardees micro-grants of $650 to cover the expenses of professional services such as commercialization plan assistance, development partner identification assistance, research partner identification assistance, counsel on patents and technology licensing, and indirect cost rate advisement, for proposal development.

For more information, contact Dana Catron, program coordinator for the NM FAST program, at 505-358-4039 or dderego@ad.nmsu.edu.

Arrowhead Center gets grant to help NM small businesses

Arrowhead Center gets grant to help NM small businesses

Laura Goldstein, NMSU12:51 p.m. MDT September 21, 2016

LAS CRUCES – The New Mexico Federal and State Technology Partnership Program at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center has been awarded a $125,000 grant from the Small Business Administration to continue programming that offers Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer proposal development assistance to New Mexico small businesses through workshops, mentoring, and micro-grant awards.

NM FAST was among 21 grant recipients nationwide to receive funding for programming that supports innovative, technology-driven businesses.

“We are very pleased that we will be entering a second year focused on achieving higher impact goals. I believe that the NMSU Arrowhead Center, being an extension of the state’s land-grant institution, is the perfect organization to run this program to best benefit and impact New Mexico,” said Todd Bisio, NM FAST entrepreneurial advisor. “Working on the NM FAST team satisfies a personal passion that I have, which is to help entrepreneurs throughout New Mexico to grow sustainable jobs and ultimately work on commercializing products that enhance our global position in the world.”

Each state submitted one FAST proposal through their state and territorial governors. The proposals were evaluated by SBIR program managers, the SBA, the Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation. The FAST award project and budget periods are for 12 months, beginning Sept. 30.

The SBIR/STTR programs are administered by the SBA in collaboration with 11 federal agencies, which collectively supported more than $2.5 billion in federal research and development funding in fiscal year 2015. Supporting New Mexico businesses as they pursue SBIR/STTR grants is a critical element in building the state’s economy and innovative ecosystem.

NM FAST, which launched in October 2015, has seen tremendous success since its inception. The program has facilitated twelve workshops throughout the state, with more planned for late summer and early fall. In an effort to reach the rural corners of New Mexico, the program began streaming workshops via webinar with much success.

Doug Adkins of Defiant Technologies is an NM FAST client who came to the program after seeing the NSF announcement in FAST’s monthly newsletter. He was able to select an NSF sub-topic, craft an executive summary and receive feedback from a NSF program manager.

His proposal, “A Micro-Thermionic Ionization Source for Chemical Detection,” was successfully submitted in December. The NSF recommended it for award pending a cooperative research and development agreement with Sandia National Laboratory, and he was successfully awarded the grant in July.

“We want to make sure that every company in New Mexico that is interested is able to compete for the more than $2.5 billion in federal funding available every year. NM FAST provides for greater inclusion, equipping small firms with the necessary resources to submit a competitive proposal,” said Zetdi Sloan, director of Arrowhead Technology Incubator.

Moving forward, NM FAST intends to expand their capacity to provide technical and business assistance to small businesses in New Mexico, placing an emphasis on outreach to businesses located in rural parts of the state. The program will tap into the wealth of non-traditional technologies, such as art therapy and learning games, emerging from research at universities and community colleges throughout the state.

“We find that each city we go to has different resources, industry make-up, culture, and sets of challenges,” said Paul Furth, NM FAST technical advisor. “Thus, we have sought to tailor our workshops to each location that we visit. For some of the cities that we visited, chiefly those outside of the Rio Grande corridor, there was little prior exposure to the SBIR/STTR programs. I’m delighted that we’ll be able to return next year to provide follow-on programs for entrepreneurial teams.”

For information, visit: http://arrowheadcenter.nmsu.edu/nmfast/

Lauren Goldstein can be reached at 575-646-5069, poet@ad.nmsu.edu.

Conference brings women entrepreneurs together to build businesses

Conference brings women entrepreneurs together to build businesses

Beth Waters, For the Sun-News10:51 a.m. MDT September 19, 2016

LAS CRUCES – To be unafraid of failure is as true a mantra to the prize fighter as to the business person.

Saying she’s in the same ring battling as a businesswoman as many women, boxing champion Jennifer Han had a message to deliver at the first WE (Women Entrepreneurs) Mean Business event sponsored by Arrowhead Center on Sept. 10 at the NMSU Center for the Arts.

“You have to believe in yourself and never give up,” Han said. “Because any business you choose to create is not going to be a smooth ride, but if you fight for your dreams, you’ll be successful.”

Those attending the inaugural event represented a cross section of local women, from students aspiring to careers as entrepreneurs, to those firmly rooted in business ownership.

Han encouraged all the attendees to find commonalities with each other. Speaking to a reporter after her remarks, Han said humbly that she relates to all of them.

“I’m just like them, I haven’t reached all my goals yet, and so yes, I know what it’s like to fight,” Han said.

Arianna Parsons, another conference presenter, was among panelists discussing the importance of collaboration.

Parsons is both executive director of the Las Cruces Downtown Parternship and co-owner of Beck’s Coffee. In a recent interview while mingling with her customers, Parsons elaborated on her comments at the conference.

“This is a really exciting time for businesswomen in Las Cruces, with a lot of opportunity and a building of support,” she said. “There’s a great environment for collaboration among women who are in business here, people like to work together, especially the younger set.”

Aspiring business owners don’t have to do it all themselves, they can work in collaboration with others and build a “tribe” to find the support they need to succeed, she said. Parsons added that mentoring among local businesswomen was key.

Leah Messina relocated her business from Baltimore to Las Cruces and told conference-goers about the challenges that move presented. In addition, she shared knowledge garnered from starting her own firm, Sinuate Media.

“Our online distribution landscape has changed, which means the web is a very messy place,” Messina said, describing her business as one that provides navigational tools. “We assist businesses to grow, utilizing those tools that are online.”

Messina brought her business to Las Cruces six years years ago and found challenges early on.

“I really missed the camaraderie that was present among the businesswomen I interacted with in Baltimore,” she said. “I felt there was nothing at all like that when I arrived here. So to have a women’s business conference like this is very exciting.”

Messina became acclimated by becoming involved in organizations such as the Las Cruces Green Chamber of Commerce.

“When I began to attend those events, I saw that there are a lot women within this community that are open and receptive,” she said.

Messina said in some ways it was as if she were opening her business all over again.

In that regard, Parsons said there is ample support among her counterparts.

“For businesswomen in Las Cruces, there is a space here where you can be honest, where you don’t have to put on this front, of all success, and every decision being a great one, and you’ve had no failures.”

Messina agreed, saying she benefited greatly from that support.

“Now I’m very excited to have the opportunity to grow my business here in Las Cruces. I see it as an exciting and productive way to provide jobs to young people,” she said.

Messina works with New Mexico State University to provide internships at her business, as well as part-time employment to those taking classes.

“The more I interact with young women in Las Cruces, the more I hear them ask, how do they start a business, how old do you have to be? It’s so inspiring to see what they’ve gone on to do in their careers,” Messina said.

Beth Waters is a Las Cruces freelance writer and photographer and can be reached at BethWatersFreelance@gmail.com.

NMSU Arrowhead Center receives grant to help New Mexico small businesses

NMSU Arrowhead Center receives grant to help New Mexico small businesses

The New Mexico Federal and State Technology Partnership Program at New Mexico State University’s Arrowhead Center has been awarded a $125,000 grant from the Small Business Administration to continue programming that offers Small Business Innovation Research and Small Business Technology Transfer proposal development assistance to New Mexico small businesses through workshops, mentoring, and micro-grant awards.

NM FAST was among 21 grant recipients nationwide to receive funding for programming that supports innovative, technology-driven businesses.

“We are very pleased that we will be entering a second year focused on achieving higher impact goals. I believe that the NMSU Arrowhead Center, being an extension of the state’s land-grant institution, is the perfect organization to run this program to best benefit and impact New Mexico,” said Todd Bisio, NM FAST entrepreneurial advisor. “Working on the NM FAST team satisfies a personal passion that I have, which is to help entrepreneurs throughout New Mexico to grow sustainable jobs and ultimately work on commercializing products that enhance our global position in the world.”

Each state submitted one FAST proposal through their state and territorial governors. The proposals were evaluated by SBIR program managers, the SBA, the Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation. The FAST award project and budget periods are for 12 months, beginning Sept. 30.

The SBIR/STTR programs are administered by the SBA in collaboration with 11 federal agencies, which collectively supported more than $2.5 billion in federal research and development funding in fiscal year 2015. Supporting New Mexico businesses as they pursue SBIR/STTR grants is a critical element in building the state’s economy and innovative ecosystem.

NM FAST, which launched in October 2015, has seen tremendous success since its inception. The program has facilitated twelve workshops throughout the state, with more planned for late summer and early fall. In an effort to reach the rural corners of New Mexico, the program began streaming workshops via webinar with much success.

Doug Adkins of Defiant Technologies is an NM FAST client who came to the program after seeing the NSF announcement in FAST’s monthly newsletter. He was able to select an NSF sub-topic, craft an executive summary and receive feedback from a NSF program manager.

His proposal, “A Micro-Thermionic Ionization Source for Chemical Detection,” was successfully submitted in December. The NSF recommended it for award pending a cooperative research and development agreement with Sandia National Laboratory, and he was successfully awarded the grant in July.

“We want to make sure that every company in New Mexico that is interested is able to compete for the more than $2.5 billion in federal funding available every year. NM FAST provides for greater inclusion, equipping small firms with the necessary resources to submit a competitive proposal,” said Zetdi Sloan, director of Arrowhead Technology Incubator.

Moving forward, NM FAST intends to expand their capacity to provide technical and business assistance to small businesses in New Mexico, placing an emphasis on outreach to businesses located in rural parts of the state. The program will tap into the wealth of non-traditional technologies, such as art therapy and learning games, emerging from research at universities and community colleges throughout the state.

“We find that each city we go to has different resources, industry make-up, culture, and sets of challenges,” said Paul Furth, NM FAST technical advisor. “Thus, we have sought to tailor our workshops to each location that we visit. For some of the cities that we visited, chiefly those outside of the Rio Grande corridor, there was little prior exposure to the SBIR/STTR programs. I’m delighted that we’ll be able to return next year to provide follow-on programs for entrepreneurial teams.”

For more information, please visit: http://arrowheadcenter.nmsu.edu/nmfast/

NMSU’s Arrowhead Center, Navajo Tech collaborate to provide entrepreneurial opportunities

NMSU’s Arrowhead Center, Navajo Tech collaborate to provide entrepreneurial opportunities

Arrowhead Center at New Mexico State University and other organizations are collaborating with Navajo Technical University in Crownpoint, N.M., to help improve economic conditions across the Navajo Nation by providing technological tools for future generations.

The Navajo Nation is one of the largest American Indian tribes, stretching 27,000 square miles across Arizona, New Mexico and Utah. According to the 2010 U.S. Census, more than 40 percent of tribal members live below poverty and less than 10 percent possess a college degree.

Thanks to a grant from the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, NTU is collaborating with Arrowhead Center and several other New Mexico universities, incubators and manufacturers serving diverse markets to help young people and businesses explore opportunities in technology and entrepreneurship. The Advanced Rural Manufacturing, or A.R.M., partnership hopes to stimulate the Navajo economy with technological innovation that transcends spatial collaborative constraints to create Advanced Manufacturing virtual hubs to conduct business and discover new technologies.

A.R.M. is a statewide collaboration of industry, academia, and government spanning the Navajo Nation Eastern/Northern Agencies and five county regions of McKinley, San Juan, Santa Fe, Dona Ana, and Otero.

“The role of this program removes poverty as an obstacle for our students and introduces a model capable of propelling Navajo Nation youth with potential to establish themselves in advanced technology industries,” said Ben Jones, director of the Navajo Tech Innovation Center.

Zetdi Sloan, director of the Arrowhead Technology Incubator, said the incubator will assist NTU with building out K-12 entrepreneurship programs similar to its popular Innoventure program, which offers competitions and camps to middle and high school students across the state. Arrowhead will also share their best practices in developing technology transfer programs, collaborate on Small Business Innovation Research Program/Small Business Technology Transfer activities, introduce networking opportunities and work with businesses to provide internships for students.

“All of us have worked hard towards the same goal, and this collaboration will be impactful for students from K-12 all the way to graduates into successful business programs that enable more families to build their careers at home here in New Mexico,” Sloan said.

Representing a consortium of universities, incubators, and manufacturers serving diverse markets, A.R.M. partners include Arrowhead Center, Navajo Technical University-Navajo Tech Innovation Center, NTU Center for Digital Technologies, Emerging Technology Venture and InXsol.

Jones said the collaboration between ETV and NMSU brings together industry and education in a research learning environment to discover, develop and deploy new innovations, ultimately increasing interconnection, creating change and self-sustaining opportunities within the Navajo community.

“Young children benefit from stable homes with an informed parental environment that provide seamless academic transitions from K-12 into college and eventually apply their own learned skills,” Jones said. “Career pathways will be strengthened in a variety of contexts by engaging parents in a degree program with on-campus childcare and internship opportunities, involve high school students in dual credit programs and possible business startup.”

NMSU Arrowhead Center, WESST announce first women’s business conference

NMSU Arrowhead Center, WESST announce first women’s business conference

Arrowhead Center at New Mexico State University and WESST, a statewide small business development and training organization, have announced their first WE Mean Business women’s entrepreneurship conference to be held in Las Cruces.

WE (Women Entrepreneurs) Mean Business brings together innovators and change-makers to share personal strategies, stories, and transformational wisdom. The event will take place from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sept. 10 at the NMSU Center for the Arts. Tickets are $35.

In May, Arrowhead Center co-sponsored the Las Cruces Women’s Career Success Conference with U.S. Senator Tom Udall. The conference had more than 100 attendees who expressed a desire for continued support and expanded resources for women entrepreneurs in New Mexico. In response, Arrowhead Center and WESST will bring together a powerhouse lineup of experts in workshops and panels that aim to provide insight and experience to early-stage and aspiring women entrepreneurs.

Along with main stage talks, the conference will feature two tracks of afternoon breakout sessions, the “I Have an Idea Track” and the “I’m in Business Track.” The conference will conclude with a Mentor Connect Networking Mixer, designed for participants to forge new partnerships, discover mentors and expand their client base. The Networking Mixer is open to all participants and local entrepreneurs and business owners. The mixer is preceded by a crash course in speed networking, a whirlwind three-minute opportunity to share ideas and create connections.

Co-hosts Arrowhead and WESST hope to build a stronger network of women entrepreneurs in New Mexico, as well as an increased awareness and support for women throughout the state. The event is an initiative of and funded in part by the U.S. Economic Development Administration University Center for Regional Commercialization.

For more information, visit http://arrowheadcenter.nmsu.edu/we/ or contact Zetdi Sloan, director of the Arrowhead Technology Incubator, at zrunyan@ad.nmsu.edu. For tickets, visithttps://www.eventbrite.com/e/women-entrepreneurs-mean-business-tickets-26669198290.

Aggie Uptown: NMSU unveils future development plans

Aggie Uptown: NMSU unveils future development plans

LAS CRUCES – After enduring about $30 million in budget cuts over the past few years, New Mexico State University on Friday unveiled plans to lean heavily on public-private partnerships and long-term leases to fill its coffers. Some of those proposals were unveiled at a public meeting Friday morning at the New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum.

“It’s exciting for us,” said Debra Hicks, chair of NMSU’s Board of Regents. “When we look at the budget, and shortfalls that we have in the state of New Mexico, and we look at investments that can be made that generate reoccurring revenue.”

NMSU Chancellor Garrey Carruthers told the audience none of the investments being proposed are being made by the university, but rather “by people who believe in the vision and opportunities available.”

The development is being overseen by Aggie Development Inc., a corporation created in 2014 under the University Research Park and Economic Development Act to manage NMSU’s real estate and water assets, as well as create of public-private partnerships.

Scott Eschenbrenner, president and CEO of Aggie Development said plans for development have been in the works since last fall, and the entire project includes about 2,300 acres of university-owned land.

Aggie Uptown

Phase I of the development project involves 36 acres of land east of I-25 near the intersection of University Avenue and Telshor Boulevard, where the New Mexico State Police office once stood.

The development would be called Aggie Uptown.

It will include 16 acres of commercial development, 20 acres to be used for medical offices, and an extension of Telshor Boulevard and Terrace Drive south into the new development.

Phase II includes mixed-use commercial development, research and academic program development, and the reconfiguration of the NMSU Golf Course from 18 holes to a nine-hole course, and the addition of a brand new 18-hole signature course.

Eschenbrenner unveiled plans for the new course, designed by acclaimed golf course designer Jim Engh, a four-time winner of the America’s Best New Golf Course Award. Engh is known for his tendency to minimize environmental impact, and Engh’s courses typically include less than 90 acres of grass to maintain, Eschenbrenner said.

Any expansion or reconfiguration to the golf course would have to be privately funded.

Phase II also would include the addition of a continuum-of-care, assisted living facility, 39 acres of residential development and an additional 29.9 acres for commercial use.

Phase III will explore institutional research development opportunities and a possible expansion of Sonoma Ranch Boulevard south of Dripping Springs Road.

Doña Ana County Commissioner Ben Rawson, whose district includes all of the proposed developments, attended Friday’s meeting. He said he is pleased NMSU is holding public meetings to share the development plans, but has one concern.

“Obviously, there’s a little bit of concern with no property tax revenue from these developments, and how that how that affects competition,” Rawson said. “We’ll see how the process goes, and I’m glad they’re seeking public input.”

Arrowhead Park

Wayne Savage, executive director of Arrowhead Park, laid out a master plan for the southwest corner of the NMSU main campus. As the Arrowhead Park development expands, it is expected to include “walkable areas, water features and gathering spaces,” Savage said.

A new office space, called Arrowhead Place, will serve as the headquarters for Arrowhead Park and will provide offices for startups. It is expected to open in April 2018.

The Arrowhead Park master plan is broken out into five “districts,” Savage explained. These are innovation, research, a creative campus, retail and a “town center,” which Savage explained is critical to attracting innovators.

“This came about in looking at our peers in the university world and research park development,” Savage told the Sun-News. “More and more, in order to attract and retain the talent that is innovating, creating new technologies, and generating the kind of economic impact we are looking for, you have to create significant places, vibrant spaces.

Savage hopes to have approval from the Federal Highway Administration to create an Arrowhead Park exit on I-10. Doing so would transform Arrowhead Park, now tucked in a remote corner of the main campus, into a southern gateway to NMSU. After approval is granted, NMSU will have to find funding for the project.

Improving the mixed-use development of the south campus is similar to plans to revitalize downtown Las Cruces, development models for the Park Ridge Medical Center and the medical districts on the east side of town, Savage noted.

“I’m looking forward to that because I feel it will dramatically improve the demand for our land-use opportunities,” Savage said. “But we have a lot of work to do in the meantime.”

Improving the main campus

Glen Haubold, NMSU’s associate vice president for facilities and services, said a new 10-year master plan for the main campus is in the works. The plan will likely involve looking at infill projects, better utilizing open spaces and maximizing efficiency on the use of the university facilities.

“We really need to look at how we use space more efficiently,” Haubold said. “The biggest thing for us on campus is identifying opportunities to share. If we can begin to share classrooms and conference rooms, and schedule better, we’ll need fewer facilities. And if we have fewer facilities, I think it follows that we’ll have better facilities — because we can take better care of them, and make them state-of-the-art.”

Carruthers told the Sun-News scheduling software should help solve that.

“We invested in a software program called Ad Astra, which helps you assign classroom and boardroom space more efficiently,” Carruthers said. “We’ve owned it for five or six years, and we finally got people to understand we need to use it.”

Carruthers said Ad Astra is also helpful in an emergency evacuation scenario because it gives officials a more accurate idea of how many people are in a building.

“We have plenty of capacity,” Carruthers said. “We’ve just never had it organized very well.”

The new master plan will likely include efforts toward moving parking lots to the perimeters of campus, and better utilizing the spaces near the center of campus.

Andrea Tawney, vice president of University Advancement, said efforts are underway to renovate and replace D.W. Williams Hall, which houses the art department and the University Art Gallery. About $800,000 has been raised through private donations, and an additional $22.5 for the project is expected from the passage of General Obligation Bond C in this year’s general election. The passage of the bond will not increase residents’ property taxes, Tawney said.

To follow these projects as they develop, or to offer input, visit masterplan.nmsu.edu. To see a presentation from the meeting, with drawings and proposed ideas, visit this story at www.lcsun-news.com.


Damien Willis may be reached at 575-541-5468, dawillis@lcsun-news.com or@damienwillis on Twitter